Archive for the ‘Film Festival’ Category

30th Connecticut LGBT Film Festival: June 2 – 10, 2017

May 17, 2017

Congrats to the Connecticut LGBT Film Festival on their 30th Anniversary this year! The line-up for their June screenings is now available and looks fantastic. Take a peek here.

My first choice and must-see this year is the documentary, The Untold Tales of Armistead Maupin premiering in Connecticut on Friday, June 9, 2017 at 7:30 pm.

Explore the Connecticut LGBT Film Festival.

Amazon Acquires Rights to 40 Films From SXSW, Paying $1.9 Million-Plus in Cash Bonuses (Variety)

May 11, 2017

from Variety,

Amazon has swept up streaming rights to 40 films that screened the 2017 SXSW Film Festival — including “Most Beautiful Island,” the Grand Jury Award winner for narrative feature — saying it will pay out at least $1.9 million in upfront cash bonuses for the titles.

The ecommerce giant snagged the SXSW selections through Amazon Video Direct’s Film Festival Stars program, designed to be a streamlined, no-haggle way for independent filmmakers to get paid for digital distribution. Amazon acquired 15 films from this year’s Sundance Film Festival under the program; it extended a similar offer to entrants in the Tribeca Film Festival and plans to take it to the Toronto International Film Festival, too.

Among the 40 titles that opted in are festival award-winners “Most Beautiful Island,” a gritty drama starring and written and directed by Ana Asensio (pictured above) about an undocumented immigrant struggling to get by in NYC; “The Light of the Moon,” SXSW Audience Award for narrative feature; and “The Untold Tales of Armistead Maupin,” SXSW Audience Award for documentary spotlight. Other films include “A Bad Idea Gone Wrong,” special jury recognition for best ensemble; “I Am Another You,” special jury recognition for excellence in documentary storytelling; and “Maineland,” special jury recognition for excellence in observational cinema.

Very excited to see the Armistead Maupin documentary as well as many other films.

Reed the full article on Variety.

NewFest Community Engagement Intern program

January 17, 2017

new-fest-2017

From NewFest Facebook,

Are you passionate about film and the many organizations that serve the LGBT community in NYC? Well NewFest is looking for someone a dynamic and organized individual like you for our NewFest Community Engagement Intern program!

Please find the full job description and information for applying on our Idealist post below.

http://www.idealist.org/view/internship/XsSh88NBtbfP/

18th EROS Film Festival (Hartford, CT) November 9-12, 2016

November 5, 2016

eros

Five films make up Out Film CT’s Autumn LGBTQ film festival, EROS. This festival is co-sponsored by EROS (Encouraging Respect Of Sexualities), Trinity’s LGBTQQIA student organization at Trinity College.  More information on EROS and the Queer Resource Center at Trinity College is available at their website.

The festival this year features a screening of Cheryl Dunye’s New Queer Cinema classic, The Watermelon Woman on its 20th anniversary.

Check out the entire line-up here.
Read Reel Charlie’s review of The Watermelon Woman.

watermelon-woman-eros

NewFest 2016

October 21, 2016

newfest_website_header_4

NewFest – New York City’s LGBT Film Festival runs through Monday, October 25, 2016. From NewFest,

Join NewFest for a celebration of the year’s best LGBT films from the U.S. and abroad, as well as parties and events bringing filmmakers and film lovers together for six fun-packed days.

Presented in partnership with Outfest, NewFest’s collection of narratives, documentaries and shorts portrays the diverse and compelling stories from across the LGBT spectrum. With more than 70 films to choose from, post-film talkbacks with cast and crew, celebrity sightings and parties, NewFest 2016 is an event not to be missed!

Check out all the films.

Queer 90’s Retrospective at Metrograph (NYC)

October 1, 2016

queer-90s

Good lord, is it already time to do a retrospective of the New Queer Cinema of the 1990’s? I suppose it is. Metrograph, the ultra-hip new single cinema in the Lower East Side has a great selection of films representing the L, G, B, and T and nearly everyone in-between. From Metrograph,

Queer 90s

October 5 to October 30

The 1990s was a watershed decade for the visibility of queer bodies in independent, documentary, experimental, and studio films. The emergence of “New Queer Cinema,” a movement of filmmakers reacting to the rightward shift in culture and the specter of the AIDS plague, produced formally radical and
political works about, and specifically for, LGBTQ audiences; directors Gus Van Sant, Rose Troche, and Todd Haynes emerged as major talents, while producer Christine Vachon ushered films by Haynes, Troche, Tom Kalin, and Kimberly Pierce to the screen. Throughout the rest of the 90s, international filmmakers such as Pedro Almodóvar would become established in the mainstream by warmly portraying queer characters; Hollywood films would finally center on LGBTQs by subverting and embracing their clichés, new experimental classics would emerge by artists like Sadie Benning, and legendary avant-garde filmmakers Warren Sonbert and Derek Jarman would make their final films before succumbing to the disease. “Queer 90s” is a by-no-means comprehensive portrait of the decade, but rather a snapshot of the years that acted as a bridge from Stonewall to wedding announcements in the paper of record.

Capping off “Queer ‘90s” is a special 20th anniversary, week-long revival run of Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman beginning November 11th in a new restoration.

Check out the schedule at Metrograph.

Why we still need LGBT film festivals (CBC)

June 1, 2016
Summertime

Summertime

What a perfect way to start June – Pride month. The CBC breaks down Why we still need LGBT film festivals,

Next month, San Francisco’s Frameline Film Festival turns the ripe old age of 40. That makes it the longest running LGBTQ film festival, and a grandmother to over 100 similar events around the world, most of which have also been around for a few decades. Canada’s three primary examples are also aging — Montreal’s Image+Nation will be 29 this year, Vancouver’s Queer Film Festival will celebrate 28 come August, and Toronto’s Inside Out — the country’s largest LGBTQ film festival — is turning 26 this Thursday. But what do these festivals represent in the wake of all the progress that has been made since they began?

Cut to 2016. In Canada, LGBTQ people have come very far in three decades, winning recognition of our legal rights from marriage and adoption to freedom from discrimination. We have access to LGBTQ-themed film and television in ways we could never have imagined in 1989, with pretty much anything available via a few clicks on our computers. Which begs the question, do film festivals created out of such urgency at their origins still matter to the relatively privileged people they represent today?

Next month, San Francisco’s Frameline Film Festival turns the ripe old age of 40. That makes it the longest running LGBTQ film festival, and a grandmother to over 100 similar events around the world, most of which have also been around for a few decades. Canada’s three primary examples are also aging — Montreal’s Image+Nation will be 29 this year, Vancouver’s Queer Film Festival will celebrate 28 come August, and Toronto’s Inside Out — the country’s largest LGBTQ film festival — is turning 26 this Thursday. But what do these festivals represent in the wake of all the progress that has been made since they began?

The three noted Canadian film fests were products of the late 1980s and early 1990s, a time when LGBTQ people were coming together to fight for the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS — a disease that governments in Canada and other nations were tragically ineffective at fighting. LGBT film festivals (or gay and lesbian film festivals, which they were pretty much exclusively considered at the time) were born out of necessity, meeting a need for safe and concentrated spaces to share work whose existence countered the rampant discrimination being faced on every corner.

Cut to 2016. In Canada, LGBTQ people have come very far in three decades, winning recognition of our legal rights from marriage and adoption to freedom from discrimination. We have access to LGBTQ-themed film and television in ways we could never have imagined in 1989, with pretty much anything available via a few clicks on our computers. Which begs the question, do film festivals created out of such urgency at their origins still matter to the relatively privileged people they represent today?

“Inside Out offers a different kind of pride celebration where they can come together, watch their stories on screen, interact with the filmmakers and stars, do business, and maybe even get down to business if all goes well after a heated Q&A.”

Despite the incredible advancements for LGBTQ people in society as a whole, it’s not as though your local cinema has extensive options for LGBTQ audiences eager to see themselves on screen. On the contrary, the only film with a lead character who identified as LGBTQ to receive a wide release in the last decade was, of all things, Sacha Baron Cohen’s problematic mockumentary Bruno. LGBTQ film festivals matter because they bring to audiences across the country the films that would otherwise be pushed out of the multiplex by $200-million superhero sequels.

More importantly, though, these festivals encourage links rather than divisions between the communities represented under the increasingly divisive LGBTQ umbrella (or LGBTQQIP2SAA if we’re really getting inclusive). Inside Out, for example, has a wide range of programming representing the dozens of different identities —whose degree of privilege in our society varies greatly — that are often lumped together elsewhere under various acronyms.

Read the full article.
Happy Pride Month!

Kristen Stewart and the Power of Being Out at Cannes (The Daily Beast)

May 16, 2016

I find it fascinating that this Daily Beast article is about two Hollywood actors who have never said the word lesbian or bisexual in an interview. This is either ushering in a new era of carefree, forward-thinking, non-identity sexual politics or the beginning of the sludge of non-identity politics to hamper LGBT civil rights. I’ve been wrong about many things, so I’m not saying either or. But the way this article frames female sexuality in general and non-hetero female sexuality in particular, at the very least Hollywood and the mainstream (straight) porn industry have a whole lot in common. From The Daily Beast,

Did Jodie Foster imagine 40 years ago on her first trip here as a 13-year-old for Taxi Driver that she’d someday return as a successful film director openly married to a woman?

That wasn’t a question asked of Foster at the news conference for her Money Monster hostage drama last week because… why?

With a lesbian-tinged horror-thriller like Neon Demon, featuring 18-year-old Elle Fanning and 31-year-old Jena Malone as hot “dangerous” models showering together about to open at Cannes this week—and Kristen Stewart here with two on-again, off-again girlfriends, 53-year-old Jodie seems about as scandalous as a librarian…

It was a bit of a coincidence, then, that the same day the festival opened in Cannes last week, U.S. officials announced an investigation into discrimination against female directors in Hollywood.

Because the gay/bi-friendliness on and off-screen at Cannes this year begs the question: Can you only be a successful openly gay or bi feature film star or director if you’re a woman, and if so, is that just another example of male-controlled bias in the industry?

Openly gay actor Matt Bomer arrived in Cannes Saturday night for the premiere of The Nice Guys, but the film stars Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe and Bomer is once again relegated to a supporting role…

“People are still more comfortable with gay or bisexual women,” says Alan Russell Carter, a longtime, L.A.-based entertainment industry expert. “That’s because it’s still straight men who are doing most of the hiring and green-lighting of films. Lesbians are in their comfort zone. Gay men not so much. Remember Rupert Everett.”

Trish Bendix, editor-in-chief of AfterEllen.com, a news site for gay and bisexual women in Hollywood, said it’s “way more acceptable” to be a gender-fluid actress in film than to be a gay male actor.

“People see it all as kind of a sexy spectacle and if you notice, the actresses who are out as gay or bi or the ones playing gay women in movies are all attractive and feminine,” Bendix told The Daily Beast. “You don’t see too many butch lesbians. It’s because a lot of the industry is still controlled by men and that plays into what they want to see.”

A veteran Parisian production assistant said the freedom actresses or female directors have to be openly gay or sexually fluid in the movie industry is reverse sexism.

“Cara Delevingne is always dating girls publicly but everyone assumes she’s straight because that’s the male fantasy,” said Karine, who did not want her last name used. “Even if you come out as a lesbian everyone assumes you still like guys. The white men who run the industry are still way too threatened by the idea of gay guys playing the leading man or holding hands together on the red carpet.”

Read the full article on The Daily Beast.

lesbian t shirt

 

 

An Early Clue to the New Direction: Queer Cinema Before Stonewall (Lincoln Center)

April 29, 2016

lincoln center queerI wish I would have known about this earlier in the month. A great pre-Stonewall film series happening this week at Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York City. From Lincoln Center,

When did queer cinema begin? What did it look like before the German New Wave breakthroughs of Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Ulrike Ottinger, before the flashpoint of William Friedkin’s Cruising, before its efflorescence in the ’90s? The popular understanding of gay and lesbian film prior to Stonewall—that pivotal moment in 1969—is often one of censorship and subtext, of sad young men and Dietrich in a tuxedo. This survey aims to revise that conception dramatically and from a number of different perspectives, considering homophile auteurs in classical Hollywood, visionary grindhouse offerings, home movies, sapphic vampire pictures, underground camp stylings, and physique films alongside radical formal experiments and lavender touchstones like Leontine Sagan’s Mädchen in Uniform. Charting a course from the late 19th century to the cusp of liberation, the Film Society’s pre-Stonewall program reveals the terrain of early queer cinema as far vaster and more varied than received histories might suggest.

Organized by Thomas Beard.

To see on the big screen: Fireworks + Un Chant d’amour + Blood of a Poet, Love Meetings, Portrait of Jason, Reflections in a Golden Eye, Who Killed Teddy BearVictim, and Rope.

See the full line-up.

Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman to be screened in San Francisco (Facebook)

April 28, 2016

Watermelon Woman

I would LOVE to be there. San Francisco peeps, this is a must-see event co-presented by Frameline. From Facebook,

In celebration of its 20th anniversary, Cheryl Dunye‘s beloved film The Watermelon Woman (1996) has been restored and digitally remastered for worldwide release. Please join SFIFF Expanded as we explore the cultural and political impact of the first feature film directed by a Black lesbian, how its wide release to critical acclaim marked a watershed moment for the New Queer Cinema of the 1990s, and the ways in which it continues to inspire filmmakers, artists and audiences around the globe. Following the screening, Dunye will appear in person for an after-film conversation with SF State Assistant Professor of Sexuality Studies Darius Bost. Bost is currently working on an interdisciplinary study of black gay cultural movements during the early era of the AIDS epidemic.

Dunye plays a version of herself in the film—a witty, nimble landmark of New Queer Cinema. When the fledgling filmmaker becomes obsessed with the “most beautiful mammy” spied in a 1930s movie, she embarks on a documentary about this “Watermelon Woman,” along the way unpacking LGBT and Black film history and finding parallels between that Depression-era actress and herself. This is social critique at its most charming and audacious.

Co-presented by Frameline.

San Francisco International Film Festival
Sunday, May 1, 2016 at 2 PM PDT
Castro Theatre
Tickets: www.sffs.org

Can’t get to San Francisco? Watch The Watermelon on Amazon Prime.
Read Reel Charlie’s 5 star review of the Queer Cinema classic, The Watermelon Woman.

 


%d bloggers like this: